Buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, the city and many of its inhabitants were simultaneously preserved and destroyed by volcanic debris. They remained frozen in time until archaeologists discovered them in the 18th century and began excavations of their complex history. Now Pompeii offers a rare glimpse into the past, and with this tragedy comes insight.

The most famous eruption of the volcano occurred in 79 AD, when a pyroclastic stream buried the ancient Roman city of Pompeii under a thick layer of volcanic ash. The second largest city in Italy after Rome, was destroyed by its eruption.

Two thousand people died and the city was almost abandoned for many years, but Pompeii remained largely untouched until 1748, when a group of explorers in search of ancient artifacts arrived in Campania and began digging. Over the centuries, many parts of the ancient city, such as the amphitheater, the ruins of a church and a large number of buildings, have been preserved.

The ashes have served as a wonderful preservative and despite the dust Pompeii was as it had been almost 2000 years earlier.

Buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, the city and many of its inhabitants were simultaneously preserved and destroyed by volcanic debris. They remained frozen in time until archaeologists discovered them in the 18th century and began excavations of their complex history. Now Pompeii offers a rare glimpse into the past, and with this tragedy comes insight.